Maxwell Air Force Base   Right Corner Banner
Join the Air Force

News > November - National American Indian Heritage Month
November - National American Indian Heritage Month

Posted 11/2/2012   Updated 11/2/2012 Email story   Print story

    


by Dr. Robert B. Kane
Air University Director of History


11/2/2012 - MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Al  -- Throughout November, the nation will celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month. This year's theme is "Serving Our People, Serving our Nations: Native Visions for Future Generations."

"I am proud of the contributions of American Indians and Alaska natives to the heritage and legacy of America," said Col. Trent Edwards, 42nd Air Base Wing commander. "As a military member, I am particularly proud of the contributions to our nation's defense of American Indians. From the American Revolution to Operation Enduring Freedom, they have served this nation with valor and honor."

On Nov. 11, Americans also will celebrate Veterans Day. Through these two observances, Americans can celebrate not only the significant contributions of American Indians and Alaska natives to our heritage and culture but also their contribution to this country's defense.

The Boy Scouts of America in 1915 originated the idea of a national recognition of American Indians. By 1950, several states had recognized an American Indian Day, and in 1976, President Gerald Ford declared Oct. 10-16 as Native American Awareness Week.

In 1990, President George H. W. Bush signed a joint resolution of Congress officially proclaiming November as National American Indian Heritage Month.

"During the month of November, I encourage our entire Maxwell-Gunter team to participate in National American Indian Heritage events and equally reflect on the diversity of America and the contributions of so many that keeps America so great," Edwards said.

American Indians have significantly contributed to the heritage and culture of this country. For example, many still consider Jim Thorpe, whose mother was a Sac and Fox Indian, as one of America's greatest athletes. Also, Maria Tallchief, whose father was Osage, received global recognition as America's first prima ballerina.

American Indians have honorably served in all U.S. armed services since the American Revolution. American Indians fought on both sides during the American Civil War, served as scouts during the Frontier Wars in the late 1800s, and were with Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders at San Juan Hill, Cuba in 1898.

During World War I, about 12,000 American Indians distinguished themselves in the brutal fighting in France. Of the approximately 600 Oklahoma American Indians, mostly Choctaw and Cherokee, assigned to the 142nd Infantry of the 36th Texas-Oklahoma National Guard Division, four received France's Croix de Guerre (Cross of War) and others received Britain's Church War Cross for gallantry for acts of heroism in combat.

More than 21,000 American Indians, including 800 women, fought in World War II. In November 1945, the U.S. Army Air Force's Office of Indian Affairs reported that 71 American Indians had received the Air Medal, 51 the Silver Star, 47 the Bronze Star, and 34 the Distinguished Flying Cross. Five received the Medal of Honor, one posthumously.

Perhaps the most famous group of American Indian servicemen during World War II was the Navajo code talkers. Serving as Marines in the Western Pacific, they provided secure communications for Marine ground operations, using a code developed from their native language. The Japanese military never broke the code.

The Navajo code talkers played a pivotal role in saving lives and hastening the war's end in the Pacific theater. Marine Cpl. Ira Hayes, a Pima Indian, was one of the six men who raised the American flag over Iwo Jima on Feb. 23, 1945, an event captured in the Marine Corps Memorial near the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery.

Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., is named after Maj. Gen. Clarence L. Tinker, who was one-eighth Osage Indian. He was the first American Indian to be promoted to general officer. He died on a flying mission after the battle of Midway in June 1942.

During our history, 30 American Indians have recieved the Medal of Honor: 16 during the Frontier Wars, seven during World War II, five in the Korean War and two in the Vietnam War.

As we celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month throughout November and Veterans Day on Nov. 11, let's remember the thousands of American Indians who have honorably served in this country's armed forces throughout its history.



tabComments
No comments yet.  
Add a comment

 Inside Maxwell AFB

ima cornerSearch

tabSocial Media Dashboard
Facebook

Facebook

Twitter

Twitter

YouTube

YouTube

tabTop StoriesRSS feed 
Holly Petraeus touts financial protection resources availabe through CFPB

Officer Training School graduates first total force class

Maximize your work out with MaxFit

CCAF graduates largest class to date

Maxwell-Gunter wingmen plan to "rise to the occasion"

NASCAR driver visits Maxwell

Happy 67th Birthday Air Force from Maxwell Air Force Base

"Hiring our Heroes" stops in Montgomery

SOS shortens to increase attendance

Air Force revamps AEF

  arrow More Stories

tabAETC NewsRSS feed 
CMSAF visits Vance Airmen, addresses concerns

Holly Petraeus touts financial protection resources availabe through CFPB

CAF domains like ‘legs on a chair’

Officer Training School graduates first total force class

Laughlin pilot receives highest aviation safety award

Lackland TRS to host Afghan maintenance personnel

Lackland medical wing emphasizes deployment readiness training


Site Map      Contact Us     Questions     USA.gov     Security and Privacy notice     E-publishing  
Suicide Prevention    SAPR   IG   EEO   Accessibility/Section 508   No FEAR Act