Provincial Reconstruction Team Combat Skills Training
An Airman advances toward a hill during a live-fire exercise as part of Combat Skills Training for Provincial Reconstruction Team members. In the exercise, teams of Airmen and Soldiers leapfrog their way up a hill while firing at targets using live ammunition. Airmen preparing for Joint Expeditionary Taskings must be prepared for physically strenuous activities during their Army-led training courses. U.S. Air Force photo by Capt. John Severns.
New Fitness Requirements for JET Airmen



by Capt. Omar Villarreal
AETC Public Affairs


1/26/2011 - RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE, Texas -- Airmen preparing to attend Army-taught Combat Skills Training prior to deploying to a Joint Expeditionary Tasking in direct support of Combatant Commander or Joint Task Force ground component missions will soon be required to possess a current and passing fitness assessment, according to new Air Education and Training Command guidance.

The new standards, which already apply to Air Force-taught Combat Airman Skills Training, take effect Feb. 1.

"Joint Expeditionary Training courses can range from 21 to 70 days, and are very physically demanding," said Lt. Gen. Douglas H. Owens, AETC vice commander. "Due to the physical demands of the courses, and requests from Air Expeditionary Group commanders, Airmen will be required to have a passing fitness assessment on record before attending CST."

If a wing wishes to deploy an Airman to CST without a current or passing fitness assessment, the Airman must provide a letter signed by a medical provider and that letter must be endorsed by the wing commander or equivalent certifying the Airman can complete specific physical tasks performed during training.

Colonel Chuck Douglass, 602nd Training Group (Provisional) Commander, said that Airmen who attend CST are put through an intense simulation of what they may experience while deployed and must be physically fit to complete the rigorous training.

"Soldiers who have recently returned from a deployment, in Iraq or Afghanistan, train Airmen on what they went through and what could be expected," Colonel Douglass said.

"Airmen learn how to actively participate in convoy operations, they are put in combat scenarios, they learn how to call for medical evacuations and perform combat lifesaving techniques."

Colonel Douglass said the training is very physically demanding because of the movements required and the weight of protective gear worn by Airmen.

"Airmen who arrive at CST after Feb. 1, not in compliance, will be eliminated from training and returned to home station as directed by AETC leadership," Colonel Douglass said. "The 602nd TRG(P) has the mission to prepare Airmen for their deployments...it is up to each Airman's home station to ensure they are prepared for CST."

For more information on JET, visit www.jetairmen.af.mil, www.facebook.com/jetairmenfanpage or www.keesler.af.mil/units/2ndairforce.asp.