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Maxwell ADAPT provides Airmen with the tools to beat alcoholism

Maxwell ADAPT provides Airmen with the tools to beat alcoholism

Capt. Mary Anne Dueitt, 42nd Medical Operations Squadron program manager for the Maxwell Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment program, speaks with a servicemember during an ADAPT appointment on Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala., March 20, 2018. Maxwell's ADAPT program strives to help individuals receive treatment and prevention services for substance abuse, as well as decrease any stigma associated with the program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tammie Ramsouer)

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. --

Sometimes, people struggle in life to cope with stressful or painful situations, which may contribute to exploring destructive avenues of self-healing, like substance abuse.

The Air Force Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment program is available for active duty service members or Guard and Reserve members with active orders, who may be struggling with substance abuse.

Maxwell's ADAPT program strives to help individuals receive treatment and prevention services for substance abuse, as well as decrease any stigma associated with it.

“One way we are able to do this is through our outreach efforts,” said Capt. Mary Anne Dueitt, 42nd Medical Operations Squadron program manager for ADAPT. “Outreach efforts include unit visits.”

This allows the servicemember the opportunity to ask ADAPT staff questions and receive education about responsible drinking, Dueitt added.

When the staff makes these visits, servicemembers sometimes ask about the referral process.

“Initiating a referral is simple,” Dueitt said. “Members can either refer through self-identification, medical, or command direction. Once referred, service members will receive an assessment to determine their specific needs.”

If a diagnosis is not needed for that member, ADAPT will provide education to ensure they are well informed about their situation so the problem does not escalate.

“In the event a diagnosis is given, treatment in the ADAPT program will be initiated,” Dueitt said. “The program's goal is to return servicemembers to full duty status by providing education, tools, and resources.”

Maxwell ADAPT gives servicemembers tools that assist them in changing their perspective on alcohol or substance use, and gain an understanding of the importance of responsible drinking, having a plan, and reaching out for support.

The ADAPT staff may keep servicemembers in the program for up to a full year of treatment, while helping to develop a plan for them to stay in remission.

“Please remember that substance abuse is a community issue requiring wingmen supporting one another,” Dueitt said. “We need our wingmen, co-workers, and leadership from all levels to help in prevention efforts.”

For more information about ADAPT, contact the 42nd Medical Group Mental Health office at 953-5430, or for a first-hand look of the program, visit this link, http://www.maxwell.af.mil/News/Display/Article/1471886/adapt-saved-my-life/.