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MSFRIC debuts New Exhibit: Faces of the Centennial

MSFRIC debuts New Exhibit: Faces of the Centennial

Dr. Mehmed Ali, director of the Muir S. Fairchild Research Institute Center, speaks during the unveiling of the Faces of the Centennial exhibit, April 6, 2018, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. The Faces of the Centennial exhibit features photos, artifacts and books showcasing Maxwell’s historic past. The exhibit is open until September of this year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexa Culbert)

MSFRIC debuts New Exhibit: Faces of the Centennial

Attendees of the Muir S. Fairchild Research Institute Center’s Faces of the Centennial exhibit debut look through photos and artifacts, April 6, 2018, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. Personnel from the MSFRIC and the Air University’s history office collaborated to create an exhibit that showcased Maxwell’s 100 years in the community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexa Culbert)

Attendees from all over Maxwell visited the  Muir S. Fairchild Research Information Center here for their unveiling of their newest exhibit, the Faces of the Centennial, Friday.

The debut was in conjunction with Maxwell’s Centennial Celebration, honoring the base’s 100 years of history.

Through the use of photos, books and artifacts, Maxwell’s history can be seen through a glass case.

The case is decorated along the bottom with fabric the color of Air Force blue. Dr. Mehmed Ali, MSFRIC director, said the fabric symbolizes the flowing nature of the Air Force narrative that is present here.

“Just about 6 miles north of Montgomery there are two rivers: the Coosa and the Tallapoosa Rivers; they join together to form the Alabama River, which is about 1000 feet away from this building,” Ali said. “Like those rivers, the different streams of history have come together to create a hundred years of wonderful innovation, leadership and collaboration here at Maxwell. While there are wonderful photos of the fabulous flying machine, the beautiful French provincial architecture and hardware that Maxwell is known for, it’s really the people that have made this place very special.”

The exhibit is a product of the collaboration between the research center and the Air University history office.

 “Many of us have heard about Maxwell’s golden age,” said Ali. “I hope that in the 21st century we will have Maxwell’s Platinum era … as you ponder on these historic images, I want you to think about how we can better work together.”