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Air University associate professor garners AFA’s Gill Robb Wilson Award

Dr. Nicholas Sambaluk, Air Command and Staff College associate professor of strategy and director of research at the eSchool of Graduate Professional Military Education, poses near a book case.

Dr. Nicholas Sambaluk, Air Command and Staff College associate professor of strategy and director of research at the eSchool of Graduate Professional Military Education, was recently honored by receiving the Air Force Association’s Gill Robb Wilson Award for his work in the humanities. In winning the award, the Air University faculty member joins a who’s who of past recipients, such as air power theorist John Warden and defense novelist Tom Clancy to media giants such as Walter Lippmann, Ted Koppel and Tom Brokaw. (Courtesy photo)

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. --

Dr. Nicholas Sambaluk, Air Command and Staff College associate professor of strategy and director of research at the eSchool of Graduate Professional Military Education, was recently honored by receiving the Air Force Association’s Gill Robb Wilson Award for his work in the humanities.

 

According to Sambaluk, “I’m extremely honored to receive the Gill Robb Wilson Award. As a scholar, I’m very happy that my research is useful in relation to practicing and understanding national security.”

 

Some of the past winners of the award include a who’s who of scholars from the humanities including air power theorist John Warden and defense novelist Tom Clancy to media giants such as Walter Lippmann, Ted Koppel and Tom Brokaw.

 

“To be a scholar and receive this award is very meaningful because our role is both to achieve discovery and to convey understanding about issues that really matter,” he said.

 

Commenting on ever-changing curriculum in a technological and doctrinal world, he continues, “Technologies and doctrines help ensure that every conflict is individual and unique, and at the same time the nature of warfare ensures that some of the factors in war remain enduring.”

 

For Sambaluk, connectivity remains at the heart of professional military education.

 

“Ubiquitous connectivity is certainly going to shape the routes through which students engage with professional military education, and events like COVID-19 punctuate that trend,” he said. “But, looking back into history I think we gain some perspective on the future, and in the past the most meaningful learning among military professionals has been the fruit of engaged interest.”

 

Looking out at the future, he concludes, “Memoirs and histories, staff rides, seminar discussions and materials engaged via the Internet are each valuable tools for learning. Passion for discovery and understanding is the key to sharpening professional military education using a combination of learning tools.”