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Inside Maxwell's air traffic control tower

Maxwell's Air Traffic Control Tower

The air traffic control tower on Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, is made up of seven flights of stairs leading to the observation room where air traffic controllers have a 360 degree view to monitor Maxwell Air Force Base’s flight line. Air traffic controllers monitor Maxwell’s flight line to ensure the safety of ground maintenance crews and aircraft crews by directing aircraft on and off the flight line safely. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tammie Ramsouer)

Maxwell's Air Traffic Control Tower

Airmen climb down ladders inside the air traffic control tower on Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, March 2, 2018. There is an eight-story climb leading to the observation room, which provides air traffic controllers a 360 degree view of Maxwell’s flight line. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tammie Ramsouer)

Maxwell's Air Traffic Control Tower

Two air traffic controllers monitor the flight line on Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, March 2, 2018. Maxwell’s flight line is constantly monitored by air traffic controllers to ensure all aircraft coming in and out do not interfere with each other’s flight paths. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tammie Ramsouer)

Maxwell's Air Traffic Control Tower

Airman First Class Evan Bivens, 42nd Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, uses binoculars to seek out military aircraft preparing to land at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, March 2, 2018. Due to Air University’s presence on base, Maxwell’s flight line is the Air Force's second busiest distinguished visitor runway. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tammie Ramsouer)

Maxwell's Air Traffic Control Tower

An air traffic controller overlooks the flight line on Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, March 2, 2018. The air traffic control tower oversees the base's entire flight line and its height lets air traffic controllers see aircraft flying within the base's immediate air space. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tammie Ramsouer)

Maxwell's Air Traffic Control Tower

Airman First Class Evan Bivens, 42nd Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, sets up a scenario on an air traffic control training simulator at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, March 2, 2018. With the use of this simulator, Airmen who are still in training to become an air traffic controller, can understand what their duties are and how to overcome stressful situations. Their training can take anywhere from six months to one year to become a fully qualified. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tammie Ramsouer)

Maxwell's Air Traffic Control Tower

The air traffic control tower on Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, was constructed in the 1950s. Maxwell’s air traffic control tower is the second oldest tower still in use today within the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tammie Ramsouer)

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. --

The air traffic control tower on Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, is made up of seven flights of stairs leading to the observation room where air traffic controllers have a 360 degree view to monitor the flight line. Maxwell’s air traffic control tower is the second oldest tower still in use today within the Air Force. Air traffic controllers monitor Maxwell’s flight line to ensure the safety of ground maintenance crews and aircraft crews by directing aircraft on and off the flight line safely.